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Shark Bay World Heritage Area
Shark Bay World Heritage Area
One of only 16 sites on Earth that satisfy all four natural criteria for World Heritage status, Shark Bay is where you’ll encounter the oldest living marine fossil and glimpse life from over 3,500 million years ago. It’s also home to the world’s largest population of dugongs and the famous dolphins of Monkey Mia. See more about Shark Bay World Heritage Area.

Ningaloo Reef
Ningaloo Reef
Jump right in off the beach and snorkel the world’s largest fringing reef, World Heritage listed Ningaloo Reef. Explore untouched coral gardens of incredible biodiversity or, for a once-in-a-lifetime experience, take a swim with the world’s largest fish, the Whale Shark. Check out Ningaloo Reef.

Mount Augustus
Mount Augustus
The world’s largest rock, Mount Augustus is more than twice the size of Uluru. The monolith measures eight kilometres long and peaks at just over 1,105 metres above sea level. Climb to the summit, follow the base trail, or watch it changing colour as the sun sets. Learn more about Mount Augustus.

Jewel Cave
Jewel Cave
Descend into one of the largest caves in Australia, reaching depths of 42 metres and stretching for 1.9 kilometres. Here, beneath the beautiful Karri forest of the Leeuwin Naturaliste Ridge, you can also gaze in awe at one of the longest straw stalactites on public display. Check out Jewel Cave.

The Pinnacles
The Pinnacles
Rising from the yellow sands of the Pinnacles Desert, in Nambung National Park, thousands of limestone spires create one of Australia’s most unique landscapes. Thousands of years in the making, some of the pillars stand several metres tall. Plan your visit to the Pinnacles.

Karijini National Park
Karijini National Park
This outback playground is home to some of the oldest rock formations on Earth, dating back two billion years. Gaze into 100-metre-deep canyons, descend into a labyrinth of rugged red gorges and swim in inviting plunge pools beneath colossal waterfalls. Discover one of Australia’s largest national parks at Karijini.

The Bungle Bungle Range
The Bungle Bungle Range
The most unique range on Earth, the beehive-shaped domes of the Bungle Bungle Range have been formed over 350 million years, and yet remained hidden from the world until the 1980s. Located in the World Heritage listed Purnululu National Park, you can camp and trek or take an exhilarating scenic flight. Head to the Bungle Bungle Range.

Fitzgerald Biosphere Reserve
Fitzgerald Biosphere Reserve
One of only a few biospheres in the world, this beautiful and botanically awe-inspiring landscape includes the Fitzgerald River National Park at its heart, and is home to 19 native mammals and more than 1,800 flowering plants, many of which are rare and found nowhere else on Earth. Explore Fitzgerald River National Park.

Wolfe Creek Crater
Wolfe Creek Crater
Stand on the perfectly circular rim and gaze in awe at the world’s second largest meteorite crater, measuring 880 metres across. It’s thought to have been created around 300,000 years ago, when a meteorite weighing more than 50,000 tonnes slammed into the Earth’s surface. Get a closer look at Wolfe Creek Crater.

Horizontal Waterfalls
Horizontal Waterfalls
There are only two waterfalls on Earth that fall horizontally and you can see both by taking a scenic flight over the Buccaneer Archipelago, or a thrilling boat ride through the falls. Created by large tidal movements, this rare phenomenon is an incredible sight. Find your way to the Horizontal Waterfalls.

more Top 10 lists

Check out other Top 10 lists of things to do in Western Australia.